HP Pen vs HP Tilt Pen – What’s the Difference?

Confused about the difference between HP Pen vs HP Tilt Pen?

By the end of this article, I hope to clear all your confusion. But if you still have some questions about the difference between the HP Pen vs the HP Tilt Pen, please leave a comment below and I’ll get back to you asap!

Let’s dig in!

The Standard HP Pen

“I’m not in love, but I’m definitely enjoying this pen.”

The standard FREE HP Pen is no good! (It sucks, in other words!)

Pen functionality is limited since it doesn’t recognize tilt and has two buttons on the side. One is held down while tapping for right clicks and the other is held down for erasing.

Unlike others that have the “flip-to-erase” feature, it doesn’t come with one.

Regarding the top, it also does not have a grenade button. If your pen does this then you can use the top button to open three different Windows Ink shortcuts.

The pens run on AAAA batteries. Oh yeah. In my town, the only place to get them locally is Batteries+, at a staggering $10 for a two-pack, but for what it’s worth, HP reports the battery should last a year.

HP Tilt Pen

“For illustrators using any drawing app, it’s 100% accurate. Just like using a pen.”

The HP Tilt Pen is near perfect!

This one is tilt-aware, as its name suggests. The device is only equipped with one right-click button on the side, yet it does not require the second button because it’s reversible.

For some reason, this is not on HP’s website, which seemed crazy to me! There’s even a little rubbery surface to the “eraser” and it’s completely natural to use.

Aside from the grenade button attached to the eraser, you also get a click shortcut or double click shortcut, but not click and hold because this actually alters “modes”.

A very very small LED light on the side shows you what mode you’re in.

Blue LEDs mean you’re “Bluetooth Mode” and the shortcuts work, but with reduced battery life.

No LED light means “Active mode,” which lets you draw with the pen and erase, but you get longer battery life.

Despite hours and hours of searching and reading (hence the title of this post), I still do not understand what the blinking green LED indicates.

A simple twist and easy pull on the pen’s cap reveals the smallest USB-C port I have seen so you can easily recharge your pen.

After you figure in the cost of AAAA batteries otherwise, this great feature easily justifies the purchase of the $30 upgrade when ordering your new Spectre from HP.

According to the tilt pen’s website, it can charge for up to 10 hours before requiring recharging. As for battery life, I prefer a battery that is replaceable rather than a battery that needs to be recharged every time I draw.